Remembering Past Minnesota Fishing Openers

The Minnesota fishing opener (more appropriately called the Minnesota Governor’s Fishing Opener) used to be a big event for me.   Heck, just check the history of this blog and you will see many posts dedicated to this annual spring fishing ritual during the sportsman’s year.   In most cases, it was more social than piscatorial…meaning that the true reason for the gathering may have been focused on the fish, but for many anglers it was really just about socializing with the people involved.

I remember spending fishing openers in my youth on Roberd’s Lake near Faribault, MN where my uncle had a cabin.   Oh, the lake was probably about 30 miles from my home…but distance really didn’t matter.   What mattered was spending time with my Uncle, Art, whom I believed at the time knew everything there was about fishing.   His boat didn’t have electronics, it didn’t have plush seating, come to think of it…fishing on the opener back in those days offered very few amenities.   But oh, did it offer memories of a great time spent with my uncle.

Interestingly enough some of the most vivid memories fishing with Uncle Art didn’t even involve fish.   Nope, to this day I can envision his beat up old gray lunch box he used for work each day that flipped open to reveal a coffee thermos at the top.   When lunch time rolled around he would pop that box open, pour a cup of coffee and proceed to unwrap a sandwich on white bread usually containing summer sausage with a dash of mustard.   You see, lunch was a time to sit in the boat, pause to do some reflecting on the day, if only to reevaluate the day’s fishing strategy that surely needed improvement.

As time moved on in my life the Minnesota fishing opener eventually meant traveling “up north.”   For those of you who are from out-of-state it’s important to realize how Minnesota’s big population center is largely in the southern 1/3 of the state.   So, when we say go “up north” that means to get away from life as we know it…at least for most of us.

Oh, and believe me there’s a certain mystique that tends to draw people “up north” here in Minnesota.   Sky-blue waters, singing loons, tall pine trees, and did I mention hundreds, if not thousands, of lakes in most counties.   Yeah, there’s a certain laid-back life style in northern Minnesota which beckons the true natural spirit of every sportsman.

Indeed, as I got older the fishing opener meant pointing the pickup north.   It meant hooking up with friends who owned boats and had places to stay.   It meant getting away to do some fishing, but mostly it just meant getting away for smart talk, fun times and a little fishing fun occasionally thrown in the mix.

Then after college things got more serious.   I hooked up with Ron Schara, a noted outdoors writer here in Minnesota, and was fortunate to be included in his fish camp.   Wow…what an eclectic bunch of guys that turned out to be.   All personal friends of Ron’s, from his high school band teacher, brothers, cousins, uncles, business associates, fishing industry notables…heck, just about any interesting character he could find.   Schara would often rent out an entire resort filled with a bunch of fishing hacks from all walks of life.

This is where I truly developed a deeper appreciation for what the Minnesota fishing opener is all about.   Catching fish might be the prime motivation for why we gathered, but truly what was being celebrated was the people who where enjoying the outdoors together.   Most needed a reason to be there.   Some, truth be told, may have never even stepped foot into a boat…but they were still “up north” …fishing.   Well, as far as the rest of the world knew.

Ask most die-hard local fishermen from northern Minnesota and they will quickly tell you how the real fishing season doesn’t begin until the week after the traditional opener.   Yep, that is when all the hoopla has died down, most of the “tourists” have gone home, and these locals can get serious about fishing on lakes that won’t be crowded until Memorial Day weekend once again.

But, of course, these folks missed out on all the lies that are told in fishing camp.   They never got to partake in the fabulous food and spirits shared by the gathering.   They never got teased for some of the stupid things they may have said or done.   Nor, for that matter, did they get an opportunity to brag when the top fish of the day happened to reside in your boat’s livewell.   Oh, so much can be said about fish camp when a bunch of guys (and a few gals) descend on a Minnesota lake to celebrate fishing.

Yes, I did this large group communal fishing opener experience for over 20 years and rank some of the memories that were made among the very best ones I cherish in my life.   For Minnesota’s fishing opener is a big reason to celebrate the end on another winter season and to kick off a great new season of open water angling to come.

In recent years, however, I have chosen not to participate in the fishing opener for a variety of personal reasons.  A few years the lake we had reservations on still had ice, so it was a no go.   Then there was the year my mother was on her death bed and going fishing didn’t seem like the place to be.   Then there was the year where my stepson’s graduation was two weeks away and I would have gotten divorced had I gone fishing and not stayed home working to prepare for that event.

Life happens.   As with most traditions to keep them alive they need to become a habit in your schedule.    There needs to be that desire to make more NEW memories and not just be accepting to live off memories from days gone by.

This year, more than ever, that itch to be an active participant of the Minnesota Fishing Opener again is stirring inside me.   Next year I am vowing to quit making excuses and to start making things happen again on the second Saturday of May.   Time to call up friends and start making plans.   A person is only given so many opportunities in life to attend a fishing opener…best not to squander it and later have regrets.

For those who will be hitting the water in just a few hours here in Minnesota I say “good luck fishing.”   Enjoy the catching, but be sure to enjoy the people you share the experience with even more.

The SHOT Show; Remembering My First Time

I have this friend who likes to poke fun at people who do stupid things.   Take, for instance, the time one of our buddies backed his boat trailer into the water and then got talking with some people who momentarily distracted him.   Yup, you probably guessed it…he forgot to put the drain plug back into the boat before it hit water.

Well, to make a long story short…by the time he figured out his predicament the boat had taken on lots of water to the point gear was floating on the bottom.   It’s about this time my other buddy is famous for saying, “I remember my first beer, too.”   The connotation being that someone just learning how to drink alcohol is generally not too aware of the stupidity that can result.

In many ways the concept of “remembering my first beer” sort of relates to my first experience at SHOT Show, too.   I was a rookie.   I did lots of stupid things.   I was intoxicated, so to speak, of the sheer scope of the event.   In other words, the first time I walked into the Las Vegas Convention Center back in 1988 to attend the SHOT Show a sensation of nervous excitement raced throughout my body.

Now, keep in mind back in 1988 the number of show attendees was just shy of 20,000 people.   Last year, in comparison, there was about 64,000 people at the Sands Convention Center which I’m guessing has a footprint smaller than what the larger L.V. Convention Center once offered.

I attended this 1988 show because my boss (at the time) told me to go with the intent of making some new contacts to sell them calendars.   Truth be told, I failed miserably.   I came home with a pocket full of business cards and none of them were leads for future business.   In fact, I quickly discovered how people don’t go to SHOT with the hopes of peddling products or services TO THE exhibitors (albeit, to some extent it does happen)…nope, folks go to SHOT to BUY FROM the exhibitors who spend big bucks on fancy tradeshow displays.

And you see, at that first show I discovered how companies had a sneaky little trick to distract you.   While you might be wanting to tout the benefits of the products and services you can offer, they have new products on display that makes your head spin with excitement and intrigue.   I quickly learned the proper protocol for SHOT or any tradeshow, for that matter.   In fact, today even more so than three decades ago, SHOT management strongly discourages any selling by roving “carpetbagging” as this practice undermines the tradeshow concept.

So, if you’re walking the show aisles and not selling, you must be buying products, correct?   Well, yes and no.   At this first tradeshow I discovered how the exhibitors wanted to “write orders” and have the product shipped to your store.   That didn’t mean they would necessarily have products for you to “grab and go” with to fill a shopping cart.   Nope, found that out when trying to leave the show.   Bags were often inspected and a “bill of sale” best be available as proof of purchase.   And samples, oh boy…a person better have a good story.

Today, however, mostly with the size of the tradeshow show tripling from those earlier years…show floor selling doesn’t appear to be as big of a deal.   While all bags are still subject to inspection upon departure, it seems to now rarely occur.

The new smartphone app is a welcome tool to both navigate and learn about what is happening at SHOT.

Okay, so what’s it like to walk your very first SHOT Show?   I guess if I had to sum it up in one word I would say “disorienting.”   Honestly, the SHOT Show is so big and vast that without a good plan of attack you just will not see it all.   A person needs paper maps, smartphone apps, and the confidence to ask someone who can help show you the way.

Aside from that the show will wear you down.   Yes, it will even make your feet bleed.   Just ask my buddy, Jeff, who chose not to take my advice and wear comfortable shoes while at the show.   His white dress socks having spent the day inside a pair of leather dress shoes made for blisters and bleeding.   Oh yeah, once the “dogs start barking” the discomfort will not stop biting likely for the remainder of the show.   Be warned and stay aware.

Another thing most people forget about is staying hydrated.   After all, the SHOT Show is in the desert and your body can wear down quickly when fluid intake is lacking.   Oh, and perhaps this is a good point in time to talk about the proper fluid, too.   Yes, the show is in Vegas and yes, the alcohol has a tendency to flow(especially in the evenings).   Alcohol does not do well to hydrate a body, in fact, in most cases it is rather counter productive.

So, by now you might be wondering why the hell would anyone want to go to SHOT.   First off, not just anybody can get in…you must be a bona fide member of the outdoors industry with credentials that seem to get more strict each year.   Oh yeah, and it costs lost of money in travel and lodging; Vegas is not the cheap destination your parents once knew.   On top of that, the tradeshow can be overwhelming in so many of the ways I just explained.

Honestly, I go for the friendships.   Over all my years I have met many outstanding people in this industry with whom I have developed very cherished friendships.   To me that is what SHOT is truly all about.   Renewing acquaintances and discovering new fascinating people to connect with in the future.

This first-time SHOT attendee was so overwhelmed by the experience I could hardly get him out of the Tenzing booth.

Of course, this is only an estimate, but I figure conservatively I have walked at least 750,000 steps while attending SHOT over the many years.   This works out to be over 300 miles of tired, sore feet walking on carpeted cement in various cities such as Las Vegas, Orlando, Houston, Dallas and New Orleans.   No wonder I’m tired.

Yet, in 1994 a book author named John Roskelley handed me a signed copy of his new mountain-climbing book, Stories Off The Wall.   In the book he signed and wrote, “To Jim, all adventures begin with the first step…”   Advice I have not only taken to heart in my life, but subsequently offered to many others who were contemplating a new life journey.

Indeed, I would say how the first time a person takes steps inside of the SHOT Show it becomes a transformational experience; an experience that will change how you appreciate the shooting and outdoors industry from that day forward.

To all those folks who will be taking their very first steps at SHOT this year, I’m excited for what you are about to witness.   …And oh yes, “I remember my first time.”

Minnesota’s 2016 Youth Waterfowl Day Was…Challenging

Minnesota’s Youth Waterfowl Day kicked off last Saturday with…well, let’s just say some challenges.

First, this summer has seen an abundance of rain which has filled every possible pothole, gully, slough…you name it.   If it holds water this year it’s likely filled with water.   That’s the good news for ducks as they have plenty of habitat this year.   It’s also the bad news for hunters because ducks have plenty of habitat this year.   Their numbers are just not concentrated in any one particular area which obviously makes hunting a bit easier.

And, of course, with rain also brings mosquitoes.   Now, in Minnesota it certainly is not unusually to still be battling this pestilence early into September before the freezing temps appear.   Yet, this year seems to have brought them out with a vengeance.   Perhaps making up for past summers where their numbers were…shall we say, a bit more tolerable.   As we ease toward winter and cooler temps the bug problem for many early season hunters is far from tolerable, unfortunately.

In fact, on this particular morning the ThermaCELLs(they had 4 of them) outnumbered the number of ducks witnessed (which unfortunately was none).   But, that sometimes happens early season before the ducks start moving south.   Youth Waterfowl Day can be highly unpredictable, but it usually teaches many great lessons in patience and the need for persistence.

What follows are some images supplied to me by my buddy, Todd Rost, from his morning afield with daughter, dad and dog this past Saturday.   Thanks to Todd for providing some visual insight into his experience on the 2016 youth hunt.

The youth hunt is intended to get young hunters into the field with plenty of adult guidance to ensure safety and fun.

Young hunters learn how one of the magical times of the day is sun-up when the morning just begins to peek over the eastern horizon.

The morning marsh is unusually quiet as mother nature transitions from the nocturnal to diurnal activity.

Whistling wings or distant specs flying in unison is often the first indication that waterfowl may be approaching.

It’s important to introduce the sights, the smells and the wet feet from leaky boots to youth to get the full experience.

Dogs, decoys and daughters…the perfect combination for a successful waterfowl hunt.

Dogs must play in the water…it’s part of their DNA to do so.

Ashley and Grandpa Dick wait patiently for the action to begin.

Time to call it a morning…even with no ducks in hand, there are still smiles on the faces because the kids got to go hunting.